Prairie Smoke

Published On: February 16th, 2019


Prairie Smoke Geum triflorum native prairie wildflower pollinator Heyden's Gardens cedarburg wisconsin
Prairie Smoke Geum triflorum Native Prairie Wildflower Heyden's Gardens cedarburg wisconsin
Prairie Smoke Geum triflorum native prairie wildflower Heyden's Gardens cedarburg wisconsin

Get to Know Our Natives:

Geum triflorum

Geum triflorum is a petite Wisconsin native perennial, and it’s among the earliest perennials to bloom in our display gardens. Its nodding, teardrop-shaped, raspberry-colored flowers have a subtle beauty that would probably be overlooked in the summer garden, but we appreciate the flowers in the chilly early days of spring. Flowers are held on slender 6”-10” stems over low growing, fern-like, slightly pubescent foliage. Flowers are borne in groups of three, as suggested by the species name (“tri” = “three”, “florum” = “flowers”).

Garden Worthy Prairie Native

Feathery Seedheads

Geum triflorum’s main attraction is the showy upright pink feathery seedheads that follow the flowers. These distinctive plume-like seedheads have earned the plant the common name of Old Man’s Beard. Another common name, Prairie Smoke, comes from the fact that en-masse, these wispy seedheads give the impression of hazy smoke hovering over the ground. When they first appear, the plumes are a lovely raspberry-pink color that ages over time to a creamy bronze. They remain on the plant for many weeks, extending the show into summer.

Understated Loveliness

Prairie Smoke thrives in full sun and well-drained soil. It spreads slowly through rhizomes to form small colonies. Due to its short stature and early bloom time it is best situated at the front of the border, along walkways, or even in raised beds where its understated loveliness can be best viewed and appreciated.

Prairie Smoke is Rare in the Wild

Native to dry prairies and dry open woodlands of southern and central Wisconsin, this plant is becoming rare in the wild due to habitat loss.

Cold & Drought Tolerant; Deer Resistant

Prairie Smoke is hardy to zone 3, drought-resistant, and unpalatable to deer so is easy to accommodate in a garden setting.

Companion Plants

Try pairing it with Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) whose delicate airy summer seedheads will continue the soft textural effect through the season.

Read more about natives in Why Grow Wisconsin Native Plants?

Prairie Smoke Geum triflorum native wisconsin wildflower Heyden's Gardens cedarburg wisconsin
Prairie Smoke Geum triflorum Native Wisconsin Wildflower Heyden's Gardens cedarburg wisconsin